Detox Juice

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I’m loving the  fat and juicy beetroot available in the markets right now and they cost next to nothing. I juice the whole lot, leaves and all, to maximise the detoxing qualities of this amazing root vegetable. It will add a sweet, earthy flavour to your brew which makes for a nice change. Beetroot increase the liver’s production of detoxifying enzymes, whilst betacyanin (that which makes the beet red) has antiviral and antioxidant  qualities. What’s not to like about that? Kids are back in school, life is returning to normal and there is no time like the present to stay healthy. Here’s my Thursday recipe. Enjoy today! x

Detox Juice

1 HUGE beetroot with leaves

3 celery sticks

2 lemons, peeled

Big handful of spinach

3 big handfuls of chopped kale

1/2 cucumber

2 apples

coconut water for diluting

Juice the lot and add as much or as little coconut water as you prefer – some may not like any. x

 

 

Love Cherries

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Included in my fabulous Abel&Cole fruit and veg box this week was a punnet of cherries. I devoured the entire punnet in minutes. One is just never enough. Knowing that Abel&Cole’s motto is to only include seasonal produce in their weekly boxes, it dawned on me that the cherry season must finally be upon us. Happy days!

The humble cherry comes highly charged and is a bit of a dark horse. It is packed with anti-oxidants, a potent detoxifier, an anti-inflammatory and immune system booster. So far so impressive. But what I didn’t know is that cherries are also rich in the mineral Boron which can help prevent the steady loss of bone density with advancing age, this according to the excellent and invaluable book Natural Wonderfoods; 100 Amazing foods for Healing, Immune Boosting, Fitness Enhancing, Anti Ageing. And, as if that was not enough, you can even make an infusion of cherry stalks, which can be helpful when dealing with cystitis and bladder problems in a natural way. So there!

Shopping for local and seasonal food is nothing new, but it hadn’t dawned on me just how important it could be until I read  Clean, Dr Alejandro Junger’s amazing book about gut health and detoxing. In it, he goes as far as saying that produce that is local, can sometimes be a better buy than organic produce coming from afar. Your local farmer may struggle with the stringent organic certification process, despite using no pesticides in his farming. As a consequence, he may be bypassed by consumers opting for organic produce flown in from abroad.  Still, the fact remains, a head of Kale that has just been taken from the ground at a local farm and driven to a local farmers market is always going to have more nutrition than the head of Kale that has grown organically but then been transported for thousands of toxic air miles. Makes you think!

Eating locally sourced, seasonal food therefore is important on so many levels. It saves us from polluting our planet. Produce in season are filled to the brim with nutrients and enzymes that our bodies crave. Buying from farmers markets or delivery services such as Abel& Cole, supports our local farmers and not factory farms. And finally, what is wrong with longing for something that you know taste best in season?  Yes it is lovely to be able to have the same fruit and vegetables all year around but it also takes away the knowledge of what seasonal food can actually taste like. Plump cherries for example, are wondrous RIGHT NOW and for the next month or so. Live for the moment, people! Enjoy today! x

 

The thing about sprouts..

imageI recently started using sprouts in my green smoothies. Nothing fancy, just some alfalfa sprouts from Whole Foods, but I’ve noticed a definite boost in my energy levels and the more I read about it the more I think it may not be a coincidence. Raw food is packed with food enzymes which we need in order to thrive. They are for example responsible for our digestion and how well our immune system functions.  But sprouts takes it all to a different level, filled as they are with goodness such as antioxidants, proteins, minerals, vitamins, enzymes and so on. The good news is that you can sprout almost anything – AND you can do it in your own home. Common varieties besides alfalfa seeds are mung beans, chickpeas, wheat, barley, lentils, soybean, sunflower seeds, oats, broccoli seeds to name a few.

Here is how simple it is: Rinse the seeds/beans thoroughly in a colander and place in glass jar with air holes in the lid. If you are using  dried beans you must first soak them overnight then rinse and place in glass jar. Place in a warm and dry position. Rinse frequently and when the little tails have started to appear from the seed/bean and measures about an inch they are ready to eat. Store the left overs in a jar in the fridge. Voila!!

You can of course buy purpose made receptacles from health food or online shops if you are that way inclined but you don’t have to. I love simplicity and want to monitor just how frequently I will manage to do this before investing in a new gadget. I’ll keep you posted on my sprouting progress. x